ELIMINATION OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN DAY.

India that is my Bharath is called Motherland
We revere HER as BHARATHA MATHA- sacred Mother
Who takes care of all her children East and West, North and South
Every day never wanting to see them suffer!

Alas, what a pity not a day passess sans
A report on atrocities and violence
Against women-child, or in teens, adult or old
By parents, teachers and others- young and old
In offices and outside, in the moving vehicles
In gardens and homes, parks and schools= be condemned.

“ELIMINATION OF VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN DAY”
Is today. Ax Gandhiji said-that day is the independence day
“When women in India is able to walk alone
Safe in the midnight “. When are we to see that golden day?

Advertisements

MADAM CURIE BIRTH DAY IS TODAY!

Marie Curie c1920.jpg

In the wonderful creation of the Lord Almighty
Great people are born all over the lovely world mighty
Specialists in Arts and Science, Maths and Engineering
To serve the society for its health and happy living!

Madam Curie was born on this day seventh November
Eighteen sixty Seven in Poland- great inventor
Of Polonium and Radium- Doctorates in
Physics and Chemistry none got earlier or later!

Pity she died of Cancer unfortunate for the great
Today we fondly remember her achievements-a treat
World needs a lot and God knows and gives aplenty
For the world to be peaceful and healthy, joyful and happy!

WOMAN GODS IN THE WORLD RELIGIONS Part II

Durga, Lakshmi, Saraswathi

In the last Sunday story on 27th AUGUST in the ENVIUS THOUGHTS, woman Gods in the rest of the world were portrayed, stating that Part II will deal with the India related Goddesses.  Accordingly we shall now see the woman Gods in Our holy MOTHERLAND-India that is Bharath.

Adi sankara is also known as “Shanmatha sthapaka”.

 

Shanmata  meaning “Six Religions” in Sanskrit, has its origins in the hoary past. While these Six Religions of Vedic Culture initially had separate followers, theologian Adi Shankara, the 8th century CE Hindu philosopher, worked to join the adherents of the Six Religions into one through spreading his Advaita Vedanta philosophy. Adi Sankara’s followers worship one divine power, Brahman in all its six manifestations. It centers around the worship of the Six of the supreme Deities of the Vedic ReligionShivaVishnuShaktiGaneshaSurya and Skanda as One. This is based on the belief in the essential oneness of all deities, the unity of Godhead, the one divine power, Brahman.

 

AdiSankara-the exponent of Advaitha philosophy is also known as SHANMATHA STHAPAKA. Shan mathas are:Sivam, vashnavam, Saktham, Kaumaram,   Ganapathyam and Sauram

SAKTHAM deals with Woman Gods of Hinduism –the main religion of

our HOLY MOTHERLAND-third biggest in the world next only to Christianity and Islam.

We have DHURGA, LAKSHNI, SARASWATHI- representing and gracing the people with VALOR, WEALTH and KNOWLEDGE.

 

Ashta Lakshmis-

Lakshmi, the Hindu goddess of beauty, wealth and fertility has many iconic manifestations. Just as the Mother Goddess Durga has nine appellations, her daughter Lakshmi has eight different forms. This concept of Goddess Lakshmi in her eightfold form is referred to as the Ashta-Lakshmi.

Lakshmi is also considered a Mother Goddess when it comes to providing wealth in its 16 forms: knowledge, intelligence, strength, valor, beauty, victory, fame, ambition, morality, gold and other wealth, food grains, bliss, happiness, health and longevity, and virtuous offspring.

The eight forms of Ashta-Lakshmi, through their individual nature, are believed to fulfill these human necessities and desires.

The eight divine forms of Goddess Lakshmi or Ashta-Lakshmi include:

  1. Aadi-Lakshmi The Earliest Goddess or Maha Lakshmi -The Great Goddess-
    Dhana-Lakshmi or Aishwarya Lakshmi-The Goddess of Prosperity and Wealth-
    3. Dhaanya-Lakshmi-Goddess of Food Grains-
    4. Gaja-Lakshmi -The Elephant Goddess-
    5. Santhana-Lakshmi- The Goddess of Progeny-
    6. Veera-Lakshmi or Dhairya Lakshmi -The Goddess of Valor and Courage-
    7. Vidya-Lakshmi (The Goddess of Knowledge)
    8. Vijaya-Lakshmi or Jaya Lakshmi-The Goddess of Victory-

 

While having a good number of Woman Gods in the Hindu pantheon, we respect women-especially MOTHER beyond God as we start training the children with the advice “MAATHRU DHEVO BHAVA” –“Treat Mother as God”- next in line coming PITHA-(Father), GURU (Teacher) and then DHEYVAM(God)!

We treat some of the women as WALKING GODS- to quote a few Mother Theresa whose birth day felon 26th August. She was born 117 years ago and adopted India as her home and literally SHE WAS A WOMAN GOD here!

Mother Teresa, known in the Catholic Church as Saint Teresa of Calcutta[4] (born Anjezë Gonxhe Bojaxhiu; Albanian: [aˈɲɛzə ˈɡɔndʒɛ bɔjaˈdʒiu]; 26 August 1910 – 5 September 1997), was an AlbanianIndian[ Roman Catholic nun and missionary.[ She was born in Skopje (now the capital of the Republic of Macedonia), then part of the Kosovo Vilayet of the Ottoman Empire. After living in Macedonia for eighteen years she moved to Ireland and then to India, where she lived for most of her life.

In 1950 Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation which had over 4,500 sisters and was active in 133 countries in 2012. The congregation manages homes for people dying of HIV/AIDSleprosy and tuberculosissoup kitchens; dispensaries and mobile clinics; children’s- and family-counseling programs; orphanages, and schools. Members, who take vows of chastity, poverty, and obedience, also profess a fourth vow: to give “wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor”.

Teresa received a number of honours, including the 1962 Ramon Magsaysay Peace Prize and 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. She was canonized (recognized by the church as a saint) on 4 September 2016, and the anniversary of her death (5 September) is her feast day.

A controversial figure during her life and after her death, Teresa was admired by many for her charitable work. She was praised and criticized for her opposition to abortion, and criticized for poor conditions in her houses for the dying. Her authorized biography was written by Navin Chawla and published in 1992, and she has been the subject of films and other books.

 

Teresa was first recognized by the Indian government more than a third of a century earlier, receiving the Padma Shri in 1962 and the Jawaharlal Nehru Award for International Understanding in 1969. She later received other Indian awards, including the Bharat Ratna (India’s highest civilian award) in 1980. Teresa’s official biography, by Navin Chawla, was published in 1992. In Kolkata, she is worshipped as a goddess by some Hindus.

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of her birth, the government of India issued a special ₹5 coin (the amount of money Teresa had when she arrived in India) on 28 August 2010. President Pratibha Patil said, “Clad in a white sari with a blue border, she and the sisters of Missionaries of Charity became a symbol of hope to many – the aged, the destitute, the unemployed, the diseased, the terminally ill, and those abandoned by their families.”

Indian views of Teresa are not uniformly favorable. Aroup Chatterjee, a physician born and raised in Calcutta who was an activist in the city’s slums for years around 1980 before moving to the UK, said that he “never even saw any nuns in those slums”. His research, involving more than 100 interviews with volunteers, nuns and others familiar with the Missionaries of Charity, was described in a 2003 book critical of Teresa. Chatterjee criticized her for promoting a “cult of suffering” and a distorted, negative image of Calcutta, exaggerating work done by her mission and misusing funds and privileges at her disposal. According to him, some of the hygiene problems he had criticized (needle reuse, for example) improved after Teresa’s death in 1997.

Arabindo Mother

Another was Mother from Arabindo Ashram, Pondicherry.

MOTHER

The Mother was born Mirra Alfassa in Paris on 21 February 1878. A pupil at the Academie Julian, she became an accomplished artist, and also excelled as a pianist and writer. Interested in occultism, she visited Tlemcen, Algeria, in 1905 and 1906 to study with the adept Max Theon and his wife. Her primary interest, however, was spiritual development. In Paris she founded a group of spiritual seekers and gave talks to various groups.

In 1914 the Mother voyaged to Pondicherry to meet Sri Aurobindo, whom she at once recognized as the one who for many years had inwardly guided her spiritual development. After a stay of eleven months she was obliged to return to France due to the outbreak of the First World War. A year later she went to Japan for a period of four years.

In April 1920 the Mother rejoined Sri Aurobindo in Pondicherry. When the Sri Aurobindo Ashram was formed in November 1926, Sri Aurobindo entrusted its full material and spiritual charge to the Mother. Under her guidance, which continued for nearly fifty years, the Ashram grew into a large, many-faceted spiritual community. In 1952 she established Sri Aurobindo International Centre of Education, and in 1968 an international township, Auroville. The Mother left her body on 17 November 1973.

JILLELAMUDI AMMA

 

 

 Yet another was known as JILLELAMUDI AMMA- from a village near Guntur in Andhra Pradesh.

Jillellamudi is a village in Guntur district of the State of Andhra Pradesh. It is located in Bapatla mandal in Tenali revenue division. Jillellamudi became popular because of spiritual leader Anasuya Devī also known as Jillellamudi Amma” / Viswajanani (meaning “mother of all”)

Quotes By AMMA

There are no “good situations” or “bad situations” as such. Nor are there “good days” or “bad days” as such for anyone.

Good days, good situations, are those where you can just experience, without getting perturbed, whatever comes to you. When the fullness of your experiencing is more important to you than your usual likes and dislikes— that is what I call a good day, a good time, a good situation.

I want to tell you that both “good fortune” and “misfortune” are imaginary. They are just subjective attitudes of the mind. There is nothing objectively real about such descriptions.

I have all the same qualities which you have. I am just like you. They worship me because, owing to their purity of heart, they see the divine in me. But I am in no way different from you. I experience pain and pleasure, attachment and bereavement just as you do. The only difference is that I don’t try to shun pain and sorrow. I abandon myself to them without the least inhibition.

 

Mātā Amṛtānandamayī Devī (born Sudhamani Idamannel; 27 September 1953), better known simply as Amma (“Mother”), is a Hindu spiritual leader and guru who is revered as a saint by her followers.

Teachings

In the book The Timeless Path, Swami Ramakrishnananda Puri, one of Amṛtānandamayī’s senior disciples, wrote: “The [spiritual] path inculcated by Amma is the same as the one presented in the Vedas and recapitulated in subsequent traditional scriptures such as the Bhagavad Gita. Amṛtānandamayī herself says, “karma [action], jñana [knowledge] and bhakti [devotion] are all essential. If the two wings of a bird are devotion and action, knowledge is its tail. Only with the help of all three can the bird soar into the heights. She accepts the various spiritual practices and prayers of all religions as but different methods toward the same goal of purifying the mind.[18] Along these lines, she stresses the importance of meditation, performing actions as karma yoga, selfless service, and cultivating divine qualities such as compassion, patience, forgiveness, self-control, etc. Amṛtānandamayī has said that these practices refine the mind, preparing it to assimilate the ultimate truth: that one is not the physical body and mind, but the eternal, blissful consciousness that serves as the non-dual substratum of the universe.[16] This understanding itself Amṛtānandamayī referred to as jivanmukti [liberation while alive]. Amṛtānandamayī said, “Jivanmukti is not something to be attained after death, nor is it to be experienced or bestowed upon you in another world. It is a state of perfect awareness and equanimity, which can be experienced here and now in this world, while living in the body. Having come to experience the highest truth of oneness with the Self, such blessed souls do not have to be born again. They merge with the infinite.”

CONCLUSION

Thus Indian culture and ethos revere woman as Gods as we have seen above but several walking Gods were recognized and due respects were offered and they remain in the hearts of their devotees far and wide.

 

INDIAN PERIODICAL
The EDitor Siddharth informs:
Your submission has been posted in our latest issue, twitter and Facebook page. Check links below.
http://indianperiodical.com/
http://indianperiodical.com/2016/09/list-of-contents/
Regards
Siddharth
Editor, Indian Periodical

Kindly click the CONTENTS link 2 bove, select “GONE, CAN’T BE RETRIEVED” read and make your remarks just below the article where space is provided for the benefit of other readers. Thanks.
N V Subbaraman

WOMAN GODS IN THE WORLD RELIGIONS Part I

Those who believe in the existence of the Universe-the Omnipotent, Omniscient, Omnipresent Lord Almighty-, gave the names and forms to those Gods themselves according to their own thoughts and perceptions, beliefs and conceptions. There are male and female Gods in all world religions. Yesterday was WORLD WOMEN EQUALITY Day and there was a post related in the Envius Thoughts and in continuation today we have in this Sunday Story Women GODS IN THE WORLD RELIGIONS.

A goddess is a female deity in polytheistic religions. Goddesses most often have feminine characteristics that are apotheosize in their pure form. However, in some cases Goddesses may embody both male and female characteristics (like Sophia), or they may even exhibit traits that are traditionally associated with the male gender (for example, Artemis). Goddesses have been especially linked with virtues such as beauty, love, motherhood and fertility (Mother-goddess cult in prehistoric times), but because of their flexibility in gender portrayal, they have also been associated with ideas such as war, creation, and death.
In some faiths, a sacred female figure holds a central place in religious prayer and worship. For example, Shaktism, the worship of the female force that animates the world, is one of the three major sects of Hinduism. In Tibetan Buddhism, the highest advancement any person can achieve is to become like the great female Buddhas (e.g. Arya Tara), who are depicted as supreme protectors, fearless and filled with compassion for all beings.
The primacy of a monotheistic or near-monotheistic “Great Goddess” is advocated by some modern matriarchists as a female version of, preceding, or analogue to, the Abrahamic God associated with the historical rise of monotheism in the Mediterranean Axis Age. (Courtesy: Google Guru)
Polytheist religions, including Polytheistic reconstructionists, honor multiple Goddesses and Gods, and usually view them as discrete, separate beings. These deities may be part of a pantheon, or different regions may have tutelary deities. The reconstructionists, like their ancient forebears, honor the deities particular to their country of origin.
Ancient Africa (Egypt)]

A statue of the Egyptian war goddess Neith wearing the Deshret crown of northern (lower) Egypt, which bears the cobra of Wadjet.
Goddesses of the Ennead of Heliopolis: Tefnut, Nut, Nephthys, Isis
Goddesses of the Ogdoad of Hermopolis: Naunet, Amaunet, Kauket, Hauhet; originally a cult of Hathor
Satis and Anuket of the triad of Elephantine
Mesopotamia]
Inanna was the main goddess of Babylonia and Assyria. Other Mesopotamian goddesses include Ninhursag, Ninlil, Antu, Gaga
Canaan]
Goddesses of the Canaanite religion: Ba`alat Gebal, Astarte, Anat.
Anatolia]
Cybele: Her Hittite name was Kubaba, but her name changed to Cybele in Phrygian and Roman culture. Her effect can be also seen on Artemis as the Lady of Ephesus.
Hebat: Mother Goddess of the Hittite pantheon and wife of the leader sky god, Teshub. She was the origin of the Hurrian cult.
Arinniti: Hittite Goddess of the sun. She became patron of the Hittite Empire and monarchy.
Leto: A mother Goddess figure in Lykia. She was also the main goddess of the capital city of Lykia League (Letoon)
Pre-Islamic Arabia]
In pre-Islamic Mecca the goddesses Uzza, Manāt and al-Lāt were known as “the daughters of god”. Uzzā was worshipped by the Nabataeans, who equated her with the Graeco-Roman goddesses Aphrodite, Urania, Venus and Caelestis. Each of the three goddesses had a separate shrine near Mecca. Uzzā, was called upon for protection by the pre-Islamic Quraysh. “In 624 at the battle called “Uhud”, the war cry of the Qurayshites was, “O people of Uzzā, people of Hubal!” (Tawil 1993).
In fact, in ancient times, the goddess and god were known as Allat and Allah, or what would better be termed as deities representing “husband and wife”.[7]
According to Ibn Ishaq’s controversial account of the Satanic Verses (q.v.), these verses had previously endorsed them as intercessors for Muslims, but were abrogated. Most Muslim scholars have regarded the story as historically implausible, while opinion is divided among western scholars such as Leone Caetani and John Burton, who argue against, and William Muir and William Montgomery Watt, who argue for its plausibility.
Indo-European traditions]
Pre-Christian and pre-Islamic goddesses in cultures that spoke Indo-European languages.
Indo-Iranian]
Ushas is the main Goddess of the Rigveda. Prithivi, the Earth, also appears as a Goddess. Rivers are also deified as Goddesses. Agneya or Aagneya is the Hindu Goddess of Fire. Varuni is the Hindu Goddess of Water. Bhoomi, Janani, Buvana, and Prithvi are names of the Hindu Goddess of Earth.
Greco-Roman

]

Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture

Eleusinian Mysteries: Persephone, Demeter, Baubo
Artemis: Goddess of the wilderness, wild animals, virginity, childbirth and the hunt.
Aphrodite: Goddess of Love and Beauty.
Athena: Goddess of crafts, strategy, wisdom and war. Athena is also a virgin goddess.
Dione: An early chthonic goddess of prophesy.
Eris: Goddess of chaos.
Gaia: Primordial Goddess of the Earth. Most gods descend from her.
Hecate: Goddess of sorcery, crossroads and magic. Often considered an chthonic or lunar goddess. She is either portrayed as a single goddess or a triple goddess (maiden, mother, crone).
Hera: Goddess of family and marriage. She is the wife of Zeus and the queen of the Olympians. Mother of Ares.
Hestia: Goddess of the hearth, home, domesticity, family and the state. Eldest sibling of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera and Demeter. Hestia is also a virgin goddess.
Iris: Goddess of rainbows.
Nike: Goddess of Victory. She is predominantly pictured with Zeus or Athena and sometimes Ares.
Selene: Goddess of the Moon.
Celtic
Goddesses and Otherworldly Women in Celtic polytheism include:
Celtic antiquity: Brigantia
Gallo-Roman goddesses: Epona, Dea Matrona
Irish mythology: Áine, Boann, Brigid, The Cailleach, Danu, Ériu, Fand and The Morrígan (Nemain, Macha, and Badb) among others.
The Celts honored goddesses of nature and natural forces, as well as those connected with skills and professions such as healing, warfare and poetry. The Celtic goddesses have diverse qualities such as abundance, creation and beauty, as well as harshness, slaughter and vengeance. They have been depicted as beautiful or hideous, old hags or young women, and at times may transform their appearance from one state to another, or into their associated creatures such as crows, cows, wolves or eels, to name but a few. In Irish mythology in particular, tutelary goddesses are often associated with sovereignty and various features of the land, notably mountains, rivers, forests and holy wells.[8]
Germanic[edit]

The goddess Freyja is nuzzled by the boar Hildisvíniwhile gesturing to Hyndla(1895) by Lorenz Frølich.
Further information: List of Germanic deities and heroes § Goddesses
Surviving accounts of Germanic mythology and Norse mythology contain numerous tales of female goddesses, giantesses, and divine female figures in their scriptures. The Germanic peoples had altars erected to the “Mothers and Matrons” and held celebrations specific to these Goddesses (such as the Anglo-Saxon “Mothers-night”). Various other female deities are attested among the Germanic peoples, such as Nerthus attested in an early account of the Germanic peoples, Ēostre attested among the pagan Anglo-Saxons, and Sinthgunt attested among the pagan continental Germanic peoples. Examples of goddesses attested in Norse mythology include Frigg(wife of Odin, and the Anglo-Saxon version of whom is namesake of the modern English weekday Friday), Skaði (one time wife of Njörðr), Njerda (Scandinavian name of Nerthus), that also was married to Njörðr during Bronze Age, Freyja (wife of Óðr), Sif (wife of Thor), Gerðr (wife of Freyr), and personifications such as Jörð (earth), Sól (the sun), and Nótt (night). Female deities also play heavily into the Norse concept of death, where half of those slain in battle enter Freyja’s field Fólkvangr, Hel’s realm of the same name, and Rán who receives those who die at sea. Other female deities such as the valkyries, the norns, and the dísir are associated with a Germanic concept of fate (Old Norse Ørlög, Old English Wyrd), and celebrations were held in their honor, such as the Dísablót and Disting.
Pre-Columbian America]
Aztec

Xochiquetzal (left) and Chalchiuhtlicue (right) as depicted in the Tovar Codex.
Chalchiuhtlicue: goddess of water (rivers, seas, storms, etc.)
Chantico: goddess of the hearth, flames
Coyolxauhqui: warrior goddess associated with the moon
Duality Earth Goddesses: Cihuacoatl (childbirth and maternal death), Coatlicue (earth as the womb and grave), Tlazolteotl (filth and purification)
Itzpapalotl: monstrous ruler of Tamoanchan (a paradise realm)
Mictecacihuatl: queen of Mictlan (the underworld)
Xochiquetzal: goddess of fertility, beauty, and female sexual allure
Other]
The Inca pantheon included: Pachamama, the supreme Mother Earth, Mama Killa, a moon goddess, and Mama Ocllo, a fertility goddess.
The main goddesses in the Maya pantheon were Ixchel, a mother goddess, and the Maya moon goddess. The Goddess I presided over eroticism, human procreation, and marriage. Ixtab was the goddess of suicide.
Folk religion and animism[edit]
Further information: Folk religion and Marian devotion
African religions
Further information: Traditional African religions and African diasporic religions
Further information: Mami Wata, Ala (mythology), Asase Ya, Oshun, Oya, and Yemaja

A Nepali girl being worshipped as a living Goddess, called a kumari
In African and African diasporic religions, Goddesses are often syncretized with Marian devotion, as in Ezili Dantor (Black Madonna of Częstochowa) and Erzulie Freda(Mater Dolorosa). There is also Buk, an Ethiopian Goddess still worshipped in the southern regions. She represents the fertile aspect of women. So when a woman is having her period not only does it signify her submission to nature but also her union with the goddess. Another Ethiopian Goddess is Atete—the Goddess of spring and fertility. Farmers traditionally leave some of their products at the end of each harvesting season as an offering while their women sing traditional songs.
A rare example of henotheism focused on a single Goddess is found among the Southern Nuba of Sudan. The Nuba conceive of the creator Goddess as the “Great Mother” who gave birth to earth and to mankind.
Chinese folk religion
Mazu is the goddess of the sea who protects fishermen and sailors, widely worshipped in the south-eastern coastal areas of China and neighboring areas in Southeast Asia.
The Goddess Weaver Valentina, daughter of the Celestial Mother, wove the stars and their light, known as “the Silver River” (what Westerners call “The Milky Way Galaxy”), for heaven and earth. She was identified with the star Westerners know as Vega
Shintoism
Goddess Amaterasu is the chief among the Shinto Gods, while there are important female deities Ame-no-Uzume-no-Mikoto, Inari and Konohanasakuya-hime.

Judaism

According to Zohar, Lilith is the name of Adam’s first wife, who was created at the same time as Adam. She left Adam and refused to return to the Garden of Eden after she mated with archangelSamael Her story was greatly developed, during the Middle Ages, in the tradition of Aggadic midrashim, the Zohar and Jewish mysticism.
The Zohar tradition has influenced Jewish folkore, which postulates God created Adam to marry a woman named Lilith. Outside of Jewish tradition, Lilith was associated with the Mother Goddess, Inanna– later known as both Ishtar and Asherah. In The Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh was said to have destroyed a tree that was in a sacred grove dedicated to the Goddess Ishtar/Inanna/Asherah. Lilith ran into the wilderness in despair. She then is depicted in the Talmud and Kabbalah as first wife to God’s first creation of man, Adam. In time, as stated in the Old Testament, the Hebrew followers continued to worship “False Idols”, like Asherah, as being as powerful as God. Jeremiah speaks of his (and God’s) displeasure at this behavior to the Hebrew people about the worship of the goddess in the Old Testament. Lilith is banished from Adam and God’s presence when she is discovered to be a “demon” and Eve becomes Adam’s wife. Lilith then takes the form of the serpent in her jealous rage at being displaced as Adam’s wife. Lilith as serpent then proceeds to trick Eve into eating the fruit from the tree of knowledge and in this way is responsible for the downfall of all of mankind. It is worthwhile to note here that in religions pre-dating Judaism, the serpent was associated with wisdom and rebirth (with the shedding of its skin).
The following female deities are mentioned in prominent Hebrew texts:
Agrat Bat Mahlat
Anath
Asherah
Ashima
Astarte
Eisheth

Christianity]

Virgin Sophia design on a Harmony Society doorway in Harmony, Pennsylvania, carved by Frederick Reichert Rapp (1775–1834).
In Christianity, worship of any other deity besides the Trinity was deemed heretical. The veneration of Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ, as an especially privileged saint has continued since the beginning of the Catholic faith. Mary is venerated as the Mother of God, Queen of Heaven, Mother of the Church, Our Lady, Star of the Sea, and other lofty titles. Marian devotion similar to this kind is also found in Eastern Orthodoxy and sometimes in Anglicanism, though not in the majority of denominations of Protestantism. That being said, the Virgin Mary is not a Goddess.
In some Christian traditions (like the Orthodox tradition), Sophia is the personification of either divine wisdom (or of an archangel) that takes female form. She is mentioned in the first chapter of the Book of Proverbs. Sophia is identified by some as the wisdom imparting Holy Spirit of the Christian Trinity, whose names in Hebrew—Ruach and Shekhinah—are both feminine, and whose symbol of the dove was commonly associated in the Ancient Near East with the figure of the Mother Goddess.
In Mysticism, Gnosticism, as well as some Hellenistic religions, there is a female spirit or goddess named Sophia who is said to embody wisdom and who is sometimes described as a virgin. In Roman Catholic mysticism, Saint Hildegard celebrated Sophia as a cosmic figure both in her writing and art. Within the Protestant tradition in England, 17th century the mystic universalist and founder of the Philadelphian Society Jane Leade wrote copious descriptions of her visions and dialogues with the “Virgin Sophia” who, she said, revealed to her the spiritual workings of the universe. Leade was hugely influenced by the theosophical writings of 16th century GermanChristian mystic Jakob Böhme, who also speaks of the Sophia in works such as The Way to Christ. Jakob Böhme was very influential to a number of Christian mystics and religious leaders, including George Rapp and the Harmony Society.

Feminism

Roman, Hadrianic period, statue of Isis in marble from the Musei Capitolini.

Goddess movement

At least since first-wave feminism in the United States, there has been interest in analyzing religion to see if and how doctrines and practices treat women unfairly, as in Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s The Woman’s Bible. Again in second-wave feminism in the U.S., as well as in many European and other countries, religion became the focus of some feminist analysis in Judaism, Christianity, and other religions, and some women turned to ancient goddess religions as an alternative to Abrahamic religions (Womanspirit Rising 1979; Weaving the Visions 1989). Today both women and men continue to be involved in the Goddess movement (Christ 1997). The popularity of organizations such as the Fellowship of Isis attests to the continuing growth of the religion of the Goddess throughout the world.
While much of the attempt at gender equity in mainstream Christianity (Judaism never recognized any gender for God) is aimed at reinterpreting scripture and degenderizing language used to name and describe the divine (Ruether, 1984; Plaskow, 1991), there are a growing number of people who identify as Christians or Jews who are trying to integrate Goddess imagery into their religions (Kien, 2000; Kidd 1996,”Goddess Christians Yahoo Group”).

Sacred feminine

The term “sacred feminine” was first coined in the 1970s, in New Age popularisations of the Hindu Shakti. Hinduism also worships multitude of goddesses that have their important role and thus in all came to interest for the New Age, feminism and lesbian feminism movements.
Metaphorical use
The term “Goddess” has also been adapted to poetic and secular use as a complimentary description of a non-mythological woman.[16] The OED notes 1579 as the date of the earliest attestation of such figurative use, in Lauretta the diuine Petrarches Goddesse.
Shakespeare had several of his male characters address female characters as Goddesses, including Demetrius to Helena in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (“O Helen, Goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!”), Berowne to Rosaline in Love’s Labour’s Lost (“A woman I forswore; but I will prove, Thou being a Goddess, I forswore not thee”), and Bertram to Diana in All’s Well That Ends Well. Pisanio also compares Imogen to a goddess to describe her composure under duress in Cymbeline.
Neopaganism
Most Modern Pagan traditions honor one or more goddesses. Wicca has a duotheistic belief system, consisting of a single goddess and a single god, who in hieros gamos represent a united whole.
Wicca

The lunar Triple Goddess symbol.
In Wicca “the Goddess” is a deity of prime importance, along with her consort the Horned God. Within many forms of Wicca the Goddess has come to be considered as a universal deity, more in line with her description in the Charge of the Goddess, a key Wiccan text. In this guise she is the “Queen of Heaven”, similar to Isis. She also encompasses and conceives all life, much like Gaia. Similarly to Isis and certain late Classical conceptions of Selene, she is the summation of all other goddesses, who represent her different names and aspects across the different cultures. The Goddess is often portrayed with strong lunar symbolism, drawing on various cultures and deities such as Diana, Hecate, and Isis, and is often depicted as the Maiden, Mother and Crone triad popularized by Robert Graves (see Triple Goddess below). Many depictions of her also draw strongly on Celtic goddesses. Some Wiccans believe there are many goddesses, and in some forms of Wicca, notably Dianic Wicca, the Goddess alone is worshipped, and the God plays very little part in their worship and ritual.
Goddesses or demi-Goddesses appear in sets of three in a number of ancient European pagan mythologies; these include the Greek Erinyes (Furies) and Moirai(Fates); the Norse Norns; Brighid and her two sisters, also called Brighid, from Irish or Celtic mythology.
Robert Graves popularized the triad of “Maiden” (or “Virgin”), “Mother” and “Crone”, and while this idea did not rest on sound scholarship, his poetic inspiration has gained a tenacious hold. Considerable variation in the precise conceptions of these figures exists, as typically occurs in Neopaganism and indeed in pagan religions in general. Some choose to interpret them as three stages in a woman’s life, separated by menarche and menopause. Others find this too biologically based and rigid, and prefer a freer interpretation, with the Maiden as birth (independent, self-centred, seeking), the Mother as giving birth (interrelated, compassionate nurturing, creating), and the Crone as death and renewal (holistic, remote, unknowable) — and all three erotic and wise.

(Courtesy: Google Guru)

So goes on the Women Gods in World Religions. Let me stop with this on this theme for this week.
In the next week, PART II will carry the Woman Gods of India.
Bye for the present. We shall meet tomorrow.

 

INDIAN PERIODICAL

The Editor informs:

Sidhdhrth Sehgal:

Hi,

 Your submission has been posted in our latest issue, twitter and Facebook page. Check links below.

 http://indianperiodical.com/

 http://indianperiodical.com/2016/09/list-of-contents/

 https://www.facebook.com/IndianPeriodicalmagazine

 https://twitter.com/IndPeriodical

 Regards

Siddharth

Kindly click the second link, go to the contents, select MAHA KAVI BHARATHIYAR my article, read and place your response on the space provided thereunder for others viewing. Thanks.

N V Subbaraman

August 26- Women’s Equality Day

 

With the theme “Be Bold for Change”for twenty seventeen
Let us observe the year’s “Women’s Euality Day”
Today! In the creation of the Almighty there are
Differences physically as per HIS will sure!

In the language of English “MAN” is a part of “WOMAN”
And not the other way! Nothing to feel big or small
Inferior or superior- both are equal pure
Indispensable and important for happy living sure!

Women are treated as God in this holy Mother Land
On this day let us resolve to treat them as equal hand
And let us resolve to make them to “BE BOLD FOR CHANGE”
Home, society and the world sure to prosper and change!

 

JOURNEY TO FREEDOM Part 20

Velu Nachiyar

Rani Velu Nachiyar, was a queen of Sivaganga estate in 1760-1790. She was the first queen to fight against the British colonial power in India, even long before the famous Rani of Jhansi.

In the long and arduous journey to Indian Freedom
Many places and persons from this holy Indian soil
Played  role very important worthy of remembrance-their toil
For all the times to come -none can erase their fame or spoil!

In the far south of Tamilnadu valiant people
From places deep stood firm fought the British tooth and nail
One such was the valiant lady VELU NACHIYAR -queen
Of Sivaganga, first to fight before Jansi Rani-keen!

Independance day seventy second shortly arrives
On this happy and holy occasion- the patriotic
Citizens of our Motherland India that is Bharath
Offer homage to Velu Nachiyar and her clan as wealth!

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

df3d4-goddesssaraswatimaaphoto

In the creation of God the Almighty, all
Living beings are born equal and stand quite tall
Man and woman playing supplementary and
Complimentary role in the world- a great land!

Menfolk in their arrogance and feeling of strength
Subjugates women and take them as objects of joy
Misfortune the way they are dealt with in the world
India keeps them at a high pedestal bold!

International Women’s day is today with
The theme “Be bold for change” and “Women in changing
World of Work: Planet 50-50 by 2030”!
Let us make it a reality and salute them on their day.

Image result for international women's day